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LibraryEASYProcess Training GuideChapter 2: Configuration Variables
Intro to Configuration Variables
Configuration Variables Overview
Setting Up Default Email Instance
Adding a New Database Instance

Intro to Configuration Variables

Configuration Variables are Application-level variables that can be referenced in various places in EASYProcess. Variables like this are useful when a value should always be used, and is used in many places, but that value may change in the future.

For example, if all emails to customers should CC the customer service email, a configuration variable can be defined as “EmailToCustomerCC”. This variable would be placed in the SendEmail service’s CC parameter and when the service runs, it would pull the value. In the future, if the customer service email changes, it only needs to changed in the Configuration Variables, instead of in each SendEmail service.

One of the most used variables in EASYProcess Applications are the Database Configurations. Database connections are needed to query either JDE or the Application database and retrieve basic information necessary. Instead of storing a connection string and the database name in all the places that perform a query, it is stored once in a Configuration Variable, and all locations across the site reference it.


Configuration Variables Overview

The Configuration Variables page allows us to define and change application level variables which can be referenced in various areas of EASYProcess. Since an Application needs may variables to run (Databases, Email SMTP server info, various system settings, etc), the variables are contained in groups to further organize them.

The outermost grouping is called a Configuration. The Configuration defines a group and Variables are stored within the Configuration. However, it is often the case that the variable values would need to change back and forth between two different sets. So, for example, “Database” is a Configuration, but we might need to query the Application database or the JDE database. Both queries need the same information (connection string, database type), but the values are different depending on which we want to query. For this reason, a Configuration can have multiple Instances. An Instance is a copy of all the variables that exist under the Configuration, but allows us to maintain multiple sets as different uses may require different values.

To begin, navigate to the “Configuration Variables” page by finding “Tests and Setups” in the EASYProcess Toolbar. Click “Tests and Setups” → “Profile and Configuration”.

Understanding the Hierarchy

Configurations, Instances, and Variables

Here is the “Configuration Variables” Screen.

The left-hand panel lists all the Configurations and Instances. The right-hand side of the screen shows information about what node of the tree view of configurations is selected. In the screenshot, the “Configurations” node is selected, so the right-hand side of the screen displays a list of some existing Configurations and gives the user the ability to add new ones.

In this screenshot many of the Configurations are collapsed. The only Configuration expanded to show the Instances is “Database”. Some of the Instances of the “Database” Configuration are “AppData” and “JDEData”. The node selected in the tree view of Configurations on the left is “AppData”, so the right-hand side of the screen is displaying information about that Instance: the variable values.

Both of those instances have Variables such as “ConnectionString”, “DbName”, and “DbType”. The instances just allow us to store different sets of data for those defined variables.

This hierarchy is represented visually below:

General Outline of Profile and Configuration

“Database” Configuration Example

  • Configuration
  • Instances
  • Variables
  • Database
  • AppData
  • ConnectionString
  • DbName
  • DbType
  • JDEData
  • ConnectionString
  • DbName
  • DbType

Categories

This structure so far can be enough to organize most Configurations, but sometimes a particular topic can accumulate lots of variables which can become difficult to manage. In these scenarios, dozens of variables can build up and in order to change one variable, you would have to scroll through all of them. This can get tedious especially if you wish to edit a group of variables pertaining to the same use case.

For these situations, Categories are available to further organize the variables. In the screenshot below we are looking at the control to View/Edit the existing Variables. Notice that at the top “No Category” is selected. This is the default option.

When categories are set up, the tree on the left looks a little different. Instead of the Instance (often “Default”) being the lowest level available to select, you can now select the Categories.

In the table below we have edited the hierarchy to add the Category level. This shows a Configuration called “EASYPay” broken down both with and without Categories. You can see it doesn’t affect the data, but it does organize it into smaller related categories which can be easier to maintain.

“EASYPay” Configuration Example Without Categories

“EASYPay” Configuration Example With Categories

  • EASYPay
  • Default
  • AddlChargeMode
  • AddlChargePercent
  • AllowAddlCharges
  • ARUpdateMode
  • ARSettlementFile
  • ARBatchUpdate
  • Other
  • AddlChargeMode
  • AddlChargePercent
  • AllowAddlCharges
  • ARUpdateMode
  • ARSettlementFile
  • ARBatchUpdate
  • EASYPay
  • Default
  • AddlCharge
  • AddlChargeMode
  • AddlChargePercent
  • AllowAddlCharges
  • ARUpdate
  • ARUpdateMode
  • ARSettlementFile
  • ARBatchUpdate
  • Other
  • AddlCharge
  • AddlChargeMode
  • AddlChargePercent
  • AllowAddlCharges
  • ARUpdate
  • ARUpdateMode
  • ARSettlementFile
  • ARBatchUpdate

Editing the Hierarchy

If you select the Instance level, the screen changes to give you access to the level directly below it. So if you click on “AppData”, the screen will change to display the Variables for this Instance. On this screen you have the ability to edit the values saved for the Variables. However, you are not able edit the names of the Variables themselves or add new ones. This is because the Variables that exist under one Instance exist under all Instances of the Configuration. So the values belongs to the Instance, but the Variable definitions exist under the Configuration.

If you select the Configuration level, the screen changes to give you access to both levels directly below it: Instances and Variables. You will have the ability to view and edit existing Instances and add new Instances. Since the Variable definitions exist under the Configuration, you can also view and edit existing Variable definitions and add new ones.

Here is the screen shown when a Configuration is selected:

Since Configurations are the outermost level, in order to view or edit your configurations, you must select the very top node: “Configurations”. Below is the screen shown when this level is selected.

Configuration Groups

You may have noticed there are two groupings of Configurations: System Configurations and Application Configurations. The only difference between these two is where they are defined.

System Configurations  - Saved in the Base database because they are considered essential to EASYProcess. The Base database contains records that are needed to run EASYProcess and should not be edited. These System Configurations must exist in every Application in order to use it. Some of these configurations are Email SMTP server credentials for sending emails, database connection info for querying the JDE or the database EASYProcess is saved to, language translation API Urls, etc.

Application Configurations - Saved in the Application database (usually named after the application such as “EASYCommerce” or “ESS” [Employee Self Service]). These are not considered essential to run EASYProcess, but may be used by the Application itself.

For example, not every application will need OrderHistory variables. EASYCommerce uses this Configuration because users can place orders and access an order history. However, the Item Approval application users do not place orders so this configuration would not exist in that application. They might have a “ProcessLogging” configuration, which would mean something to the developers using it, but in EASYCommerce, it is not defined.


Setting Up Default Email Instance

Open Profile and Configuration

On the top toolbar in EASYProcess, go to Tests and Setups → Profile and Configuration.

Open “Default” Instance of “SendEmail” Configuration

On the Profile and Configuration screen, expend the “SendEmail” node under “Systems” to reveal the “Default” Instance.

Fill Out Instance Variables

Fill out the data with valid information (your valid information) to send out an email as shown below.

Note: The password you will use in the below shown screen is “easy_123”.

From Email Id: demo@krisesystems.com

Password: easy_123

SMTP Server: smtp.gmail.com

Test Email Id: test@gmail.com

Test Mode: True

User Id: demo@krisesystems.com

Use SSL: True

Your Instance is Ready to Use

Now your SendEmail Default Instance is configured and is ready to use! In a process canvas, email services can be auto-filled with the configuration variables you just filled out. Below is a screenshot of the “SendEmail” service (a service from the process canvas with the same name as the configuration) referencing the Default Instance you just configured.


Adding a New Database Instance

Open Profile and Configuration

On the top toolbar in EASYProcess, go to Tests and Setups → Profile and Configuration.

Open the “Database” Configuration

On the Profile and Configuration screen, click on the “Database” node under “Systems” to see the screen below.

Configure a New Instance

Fill out the “Add New Instance” screen with the following information and click “Add”.

Instance: JDETEST

Instance Description: JDE Test Library

Test Process Id: PRC-10000103

Fill Out Instance Variables

The newly added instance inherits the variable definitions from its configuration. When you click on the newly created instance you will see these variables with blank values. The next step is to fill out the variables to make the instance useable.

Click your instance to edit the variables. Click save when you're done.

 

Sample Connection Strings:

  • MSSQL
  • server=127.0.0.1;database=KSmartDev;User Id=sa;Password=
  • ODBC
  • Provider=IBMDA400;Password=password;User ID=user;Data Source=10.6.1.5;
  • Driver={Microsoft Excel Driver (*.xls)};DriverId=790;Dbq=C:\MyExcel.xls;DefaultDir=c:\mypath;
  • Driver={Microsoft ODBC for Oracle};Server=serverUid=username;Pwd=password;
  • Driver={SQL Server};Server=servername;Database=database;Uid=username;Pwd=password;
  • Driver={SQL Server};Server=myServerAddress;Database=myDataBase;Uid=myUsername;Pwd=myPassword;
  • OleDb
  • Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Data Source=excelfilename;Extended Properties="Excel 8.0;HDR=Yes;IMEX=1"
  • Provider=IBMDA400;Password=password;User ID=user;Data Source=10.6.1.5;
  • Provider=OraOLEDB.Oracle;Data Source=B733C;User Id=user;Password=pwd;
  • Provider=sqloledb;Data Source=myServerAddress;Initial Catalog=myDataBase;User Id=myUsername;Password=myPassword;
  • Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Data Source=c:\txtFilesFolder\;Extended Properties="text;HDR=Yes;FMT=Delimited";

Your New Database Instance is Ready to Use

Now your Database Instance is ready to use! Anywhere in EASYProcess where a configuration variable could be used will now show your new Database Instance (process canvas, Run SQL Tool, Webparts, etc). Below is a screenshot of the new Database Instance available in the left hand Configurations panel from within a process canvas.


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